BuzzFeed recently published a presidential preference poll for their readership to take part in. A day or so later, they felt the need to “update” it because they felt the results “no longer accurately reflects the opinions of real people.” Take three guesses as to what the results were showing. Polls are something that many media outlets do. They're a quick thing that will catch people’s attention during a heated presidential cycle and will hopefully get the public to click on the outlet's website. Undoubtedly, BuzzFeed also did this figuring that the “poll” would have a strong showing for H
It’s only a short period of time before the whole thing is taken over by the U.N., or U.N. specialized agencies, 190 members. The Internet as we have known it is about to disappear, and I think that has national security implications. It certainly has implications for freedom of communication internationally. I cannot understand it. You know, here we are in a tight election campaign, where Hillary Clinton is in deep trouble among millennials, there’s no enthusiasm for her, they’re voting for third party candidates. Here’s a chance for the party as a whole to make deep inroads into a group tha
Leslie Jones’ new movie, Masterminds, cracks jokes about how the actress looks like a man, and yet no one involved in the film’s production has been suspended from social media for the offense. In July, Breitbart Tech editor Milo Yiannopoulos was permanently banned from Twitter after writing a negative review of Ghostbusters and joking later in a tweet that Jones looks like a “dude.” After Twitter kicked Milo off their platform, establishment news outlets claimed that his joke was “inciting harassment” of Jones.
Facebook’s artificial intelligence chief worked on the development of systems which could one day help computers automatically spy on humans, The Sun Online has learned. Yann LeCun, leader of Mark Zuckerberg’s AI research division, contributed to academic papers exploring the creation of software which would serve as a “key component” in an automated surveillance network. A Russian computer expert has already shown the terrifying implications of modern surveillance technology by tracking down women he spotted on the street using just one photograph.
President Obama’s drive to hand off control of Internet domains will give very unpleasant regimes equal say over the future of online speech. President Barack Obama’s drive to hand off control of Internet domains to a foreign multi-national operation will give some very unpleasant regimes equal say over the future of online speech and commerce. In fact, they are likely to have much more influence than America, because they will collectively push hard for a more tightly controlled Internet, and they are known for aggressively using political and economic pressure to get what they want.
The Obama administration is poised to surrender control of certain Internet functions to non-profit ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, on October 1. “As a private organization, ICANN is not bound by the First Amendment, which ICANN’s CEO and President Göran Marby admitted in a recent Senate hearing,” “The First Amendment applies only to the [American] government. So if the government is out of the picture, the First Amendment is too. And that means that ICANN would be free to regulate internet speech by restricting which websites can gain access to the internet ba
What they’re preparing to do is to cede, or surrender, the last vestige of American control, or even influence, over what is done with critical functions of the Internet. It gets pretty arcane, but the point is, if you think that the freedom of the Internet – whether it’s the ability of people to communicate freely information on it, or whether you think of it as an engine for free enterprise, let alone if you understand the contribution that it makes these days to national security – including, by the way, the operations of our critical infrastructure – you will understand that the United St
Skyscrapers in the City of London could soon be built by robots rather than by people, according to the boss of one of the UK. The result would be huge productivity gains as more work could be done by fewer people – but also mass layoffs as traditionally labour-intensive construction projects hire fewer and fewer staff. “We’re moving into the era of the robots,” said Alison Carnwath, the chairman of Land Securities. “Businesses are focusing on [productivity], they want to reengineer how their people can work, they recognise that technology is upon us and is going to destroy thousands of jobs,