Facebook Inc Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg laid out a vision on Thursday of his company serving as a bulwark against rising isolationism, writing in a letter to users that the company's platform could be the "social infrastructure" for the globe. In a 5,700-word manifesto, Zuckerberg, founder of the world’s largest social network, quoted Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. president during the country’s 19th century Civil War known for his eloquence, and offered a philosophical sweep that was unusual for a business magnate. Zuckerberg’s comments come at a time when many people and nations around the
Facebook’s creator and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday posted a lengthy note rebuking isolationist “America First” sentiment, and touted the merits of globalization and a “global community” working for innovation and progress. Discouraged by the underlying suspicion of foreign entities, as seen during the 2016 election and the rise of President Trump, Zuckerberg wrote that he wants to refocus Facebook on helping people come together across borders.
Twitter has introduced an account limiting penalty for users that violate the platform's terms of service. This new feature seems to be part of Twitter’s recent attempts to curb “abuse” on the platform. The changes include extra measures to stop suspended users from creating new accounts, “safer search results,” and the collapsing of “potentially abusive or low-quality Tweets.” Twitter was forced to reverse one of their most recent features that removed notifications that alerted users when they were added to Twitter lists. “Being added to a list and knowing what list you were added to was li
Billionaire Elon Musk is known for his futuristic ideas and his latest suggestion might just save us from being irrelevant as artificial intelligence (AI) grows more prominent. During his talk, Musk touched upon his fear of "deep AI" which goes beyond driverless cars to what he called "artificial general intelligence". This he described as AI that is "smarter than the smartest human on earth" and called it a "dangerous situation".
Things changed in 2009, when regulators blocked Facebook and Twitter in an information lockdown after riots in China ’s Muslim Xinjiang region. State media said riot leaders used social media to stir unrest. Chinese security forces clamped down on large parts of this city of 2.4 million Monday, a day after long-simmering ethnic tensions erupted in rioting that authorities said left 156 dead and more than 1,000 injured.
YouTube disabled MILO's livestreaming ability just hours before his speech on immigration at the University of New Mexico. “Your video ‘MILO At UC – Colorado Springs: Democrats Are The ‘Party Of The Cuckold’ was flagged for review. Upon review, we’ve determined that it violates our guidelines,” YouTube declared in a notice to MILO. “We’ve removed it from YouTube and assigned a Community Guidelines strike, or temporary penalty, to your account.”
Victim had clothes pulled off by armed men and was sexually assaulted before cops arrived and turned off the camera. TWO migrants from Afghanistan have reportedly been arrested over the three-hour gang rape of a woman that was broadcast on Facebook Live. The two men, aged 18 and 20, who are both from Afghanistan, were arrested in the city at the weekend after police were tipped off by social media users, it was reported by The Local newspaper.
The company routinely weeds out "bad ads." Now it weeds out more bad ad publishers, too. Publishers were banned in November and December and included sites that impersonate real news organizations through shortened top-level domains, according to Google’s 2016 “bad ads” report, normally released at the beginning of each year. So-called fake news publishers will sometimes take advantage of “.co” domains by appearing similar to legitimate news sites that would normally end in “.com.” Google declined to provide a listing of the banned sites.